bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

There should be word for the exhilaration of a half-success coupled with the glowing disappointment of the half-failure, that two-sided coin.

— Claire Light, Sense8 and the Failure of Global Imagination”

Mirrored from Under the Beret.

bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

I’m sure we’ll continue to talk amongst ourselves about how to handle the current crisis. Cis people don’t get to lead that conversation. We don’t care what you think. We’re more concerned with what you do, or more often, what you don’t do.

– eastsidekate at Shakesville

Mirrored from Under the Beret.

bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

My adult understanding of my childhood with my father doesn’t erase the effects of his policing. I felt his gaze always following me, making me feel isolated as I quietly grappled with my identity. The loneliness and self-consciousness from these exchanges made me vulnerable in a way I wasn’t able to recognize until decades later.

– Janet Mock, Redefining Realness

Mirrored from Under the Beret.

bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

Cornel West reminds us that justice is what love looks like in public.

- Laverne Cox

Mirrored from Under the Beret.

bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

I am what you designed me to be. I am your blade. You cannot now complain if you also feel the hurt”

Great Expectations, Charles Dickens

Mirrored from Under the Beret.

bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

Massive poverty and obscene inequality are such terrible scourges of our times — times in which the world boasts breathtaking advances in science, technology, industry and wealth accumulation — that they have to rank alongside slavery and apartheid as social evils.

[...]

Like slavery and apartheid, poverty is not natural. It is man-made and it can be overcome and eradicated by the actions of human beings.

And overcoming poverty is not a gesture of charity. It is an act of justice. It is the protection of a fundamental human right, the right to dignity and a decent life.

While poverty persists, there is no true freedom.

– Nelson Mandela’s speech in support of “Make Poverty History”

Mirrored from Under the Beret.

bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

I would stop talking about the past, if it weren’t so present.

- Barthélemy Boganda

Mirrored from Under the Beret.

bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

Because being an asshole is not an opinion, it’s just being an asshole.

– Mary Robinette Kowal

Mirrored from Under the Beret.

bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

Here’s the thing: People fucking despise trans women. Often the nicest thing they can thing of to say to trans woman is “gosh, you are so little like a trans woman!” Being trans is something to avoid, to exclude, to escape, at worst to nobly bare up under.

But I’m done with it. You can be trans or cis. You can be super femme, you can be ultra butch. You can be straight or queer. You can have people saying you’re a transcendent beauty who just stepped off a Renaissance canvas, you can have people saying you’re a stomach turning monster. You can be a light in the world who every person you meet loves and devotes themselves to, you can be an awkward storm cloud who drives everyone away.

– Vivian Taylor, I’m A Trans Woman And I’m Not Interested In Being One of the “Good Ones”

Mirrored from Under the Beret.

bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

Here’s Scrabble’s dirty little secret: the game is really about maximizing points and space to yield the highest return. Someone who has memorized all the acceptable two-letter words in the formalized dictionary will do much better than someone who knows how to use ‘paletot’ in a sentence. You can forget about neologisms like “eponysterical” or archaic remnants found only in the OED. Scrabble rewards efficiency, memorization and fortune, while remaining ambivalent to creativity, imagination and verve. Maximize property value, minimize artistic expression.

It’s about capitalism, basically.

– Michael Stewart, “Scrabble’s dirty secret”, rabble.ca

Mirrored from Under the Beret.

bcholmes: (yes)

And, in the end, it simply isn't worth
Your while to try and clean your life away.
You can't. For, everything you do or say
Is there, forever. It leaves evidence.
In fact it's really only common sense;
There's no such thing as nothing, not at all.
It may be really very, very small
But it's still there. In fact I think I'd guess
That "no" does not exist. There's only "yes".

Yes

bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

Activism is the rent I pay for living on this planet.

— Alice Walker

bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

Well, y'know, that's functioning democracy. It's beyond anything we can conceive of here. And that's a problem about the United States -- and Europe and the other wealthy industrial countries. The concept of democracy has just been so impoverished that we have to go to the poorest countries in the world to see what democracy means.

Noam Chomsky

bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

"I love WL's [white liberals], love 'em to death. They're on our side," he had told me some days ago, defining the term. "But WL's think all the world's problems can be fixed without any cost to themselves. We don't believe that."

— Paul Farmer, as quoted in Tracy Kidder's Mountains Beyond Mountains

bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

If you're in trouble or hurt or need -- go to poor people. They're the only ones that'll help -- the only ones.

The Grapes of Wrath

bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

Yes, I heard about RaceFail '09 some time after the event, and rather regret not having been there while it was going on. The category of Political Correctness is so nebulous that it's rarely very helpful, particularly because it is often used disgracefully as a stick with which to beat anti-racists or progressives. In the broader sense, I absolutely do think that the implicit politics of our narratives, whether we are consciously "meaning" them or not, matter, and that therefore we should be as thoughtful about them as possible. That doesn't mean we'll always succeed in political perspicacity—which doesn't mean the same thing as tiptoeing —but we should try. So for example: If you have a world in which Orcs are evil, and you depict them as evil, I don't know how that maps onto the question of "political correctness." However, the point is not that you're misrepresenting Orcs (if you invented this world, that's how Orcs are), but that you have replicated the logic of racism, which is that large groups of people are "defined" by an abstract supposedly essential element called "race," whatever else you were doing or intended. And that's not an innocent thing to do. Maybe you have a race of female vampires who destroy men's strength. They really do operate like that in your world. But I think you're kidding yourself if you think that that idea just appeared ex nihilo in your head and has nothing to do with the incredibly strong, and incredibly patriarchal, anxiety about the destructive power of women's sexuality in our very real world. These things are not reducible to our "intent"—we all inherit all kinds of bits and pieces of cultural bumf, plenty of them racist and sexist and homophobic, because that's how our world works, so how could you avoid it?

So I'd suggest that one should be open-eyed about the facts that the categories with which we think and write and read, are not innocent, and that we should do our best not to use them to replicate the worst aspects of the cultural bumf that put them in our heads in the first place. Does that mean being politically correct? If that is deemed to mean being conscious of and careful about the political ramifications of our writing, then surely that's the only decent way to proceed.

"10 Questions with China Miéville"

Via [livejournal.com profile] silentq

bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

Indeed, indeed, I cannot tell

Indeed, indeed, I cannot tell,
Though I ponder on it well,
Which were easier to state,
All my love or all my hate.
Surely, surely, thou wilt trust me
When I say thou dost disgust me.
O, I hate thee with a hate
That would fain annihilate;
Yet sometimes against my will,
My dear friend, I love thee still.
It were treason to our love,
And a sin to God above,
One iota to abate
Of a pure impartial hate.

— Henry David Thoreau














bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

If the individual remains engaged, he or she can turn the discomfort into action. Once they have an awareness of the cycle of racism, many people are angered by it and want to interrupt it. Often action comes in the form of educating others -- pointing out the stereotypes as they watch television, interrupting the racial jokes, writing letters to the editor, sharing articles with friends and family. Like new converts, people experiencing disintegration can be quite zealous in their efforts. A White woman in her forties who participated in an antiracist professional development course for educators described herself at this stage:

What it was like for me when I was taking the course [one year ago] and just afterwards, hell, because this dissonance stuff doesn't feel all that great. And trying to put it in a perspective and figure out what to do with it is very hard... I was on the band wagon so I'm not going to be quiet about it. So there was dissonance everywhere. Personally, I remember going home for Thanksgiving, the first Thanksgiving [while taking the course], back to our families... and turning to my brother-in-law and saying, "I really don't want you to say that in front of me -- I don't want to hear that joke -- I am not interested." ... At every turn it seemed like there, I was responsible for saying something... My husband, who I think is a very good, a very liberal person, but who really hasn't been through [this], saying "You know I think you're taking yourself too seriously here and where is your sense of humour? You have lost your sense of humour." And my saying, "It isn't funny; you don't understand, it just isn't funny to me." Not that he would ever tell a racial joke, but there were these things that would come up and he would just sort of look back and say, "I don't understand where you're coming from now." So there was a lot of dissonance... I don't think anybody was too comfortable with me for a while.

My college students have similar experiences with family members and friends. Though they want to step off the cycle of racism, the message from the surrounding White community seems to be, "Get back on!"

— Beverly Daniel Tatum, "Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?"

bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)
Poet to Bigot

I have done so little
For you,
And you have done so little
For me,
That we have good reason
Never to agree.

I, however,
Have such meagre
Power,
Clutching at a
Moment,
While you control
An hour.

But your hour is
A stone.

My moment is
A flower.

— Langston Hughes

I've posted this before, but not in quite a while. It may well be my favourite Hughes.

bcholmes: I was just a brain in a jar (brain thoughts)

Going on the Wagon

So many old Indians stopped drinking
one drink before
the drink which would've killed them.

I'll write poetry exactly that way.

— Sherman Alexie



Profile

bcholmes: (Default)
BC Holmes

March 2017

S M T W T F S
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios